Articles

2021

Czepiel, A., Fink, L.K., Fink, L.T., Wald-Fuhrmann, M., Tröndle, M., & Merrill, J. (2021). Synchrony in the periphery: inter-subject correlation of physiological responses during live music concerts. Scientific Reports 11, 22457. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-00492-3.

Wittstock, S., Sperber, L., Kirk, G., McCarty, K., de Sola-Smith, K., Wade, J., Simon, M., Fink, L. (2021, in press). Making what we know explicit: Perspectives from graduate writing consultants on supporting graduate writers. Praxis: A Writing Center Journal.

Fink, L. (2021). Computational models of temporal expectations. Proceedings of the Future Directions of Music Cognition International Conference, pp. 208-213. https://doi.org/10.18061/FDMC.2021.0041.

Fink, L.K., Warrenburg, L. A., Howlin, C., Randall, W. M., +Hansen, N. C., & +Wald-Fuhrmann, M. (2021). Viral Tunes: Changes in musical behaviours and interest in coronamusic predict socio-emotional coping during COVID-19 lockdown. *Humanities & Social Sciences Communications 8:180. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-021-00858-y.

Durojaye, C., Fink, L., Wald-Fuhrmann, M., Roeske, T. & Larrouy-Maestri, P. (2021). Perception of Nigerian Dùndún Talking Drum Performances as Speech-Like vs. Music-Like: The Role of Familiarity and Acoustic Cues. Front. Psychol. 12:652673. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.652673.

2020

Sharma, N., Krishnamohan, V., Ganapathy, S., Gangopadhayay, A. & Fink, L. (2020). Acoustic and linguistic features influence talker change detection. J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. Express Letters 147(5). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1121/10.0002462.

N. Sharma, V. Krishnamohan, S. Ganapathy, A. Gangopadhayay & L. Fink (2020). On The Impact of Language Familiarity in Talker Change Detection. ICASSP 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), Barcelona, Spain, pp. 6249-6253. DOI: 10.1109/ICASSP40776.2020.9054294.

2019

Fink, L., Lange, E., & Groner, R. (2019). The application of eye-tracking in music research. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 11(2):1. DOI: https://doi.org/10.16910/jemr.11.2.1.

2018

Fink, L., Hurley, B., Geng, J. & Janata, P. (2018). A linear oscillator model predicts dynamic temporal attention and pupillary sensorimotor synchronization to rhythmic musical patterns. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 11(2):12. DOI: 10.16910/jemr.11.2.12.

Hurley, B., Fink, L., & Janata, P. (2018). Mapping the dynamic allocation of attention in musical patterns. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 44(11), 1694-1711. DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000563

2017

Fink, L. (2017). Chance Operations in Neuroscience. In J. Lane & L. Fink (Eds.), Allen Otte Folio (pp. 17-20).

2016

Fink, L. (2016). The Greatest. Pulse Special Issue of Ethnomusicology Review/Sounding Board.



Edited volumes

Fink, L. & Lange, E. (2019). Special Issue on Music & Eye-Tracking. Journal of Eye Movement Research.

L. Fink (Ed.) (2017). Explorations: The UC Davis Undergraduate Research Journal. (Vol. 19). The Regents of the University of California.

J. Lane & L. Fink (Eds.). (2017). Allen Otte Folio. Preview Program as pdf. Available to purchase from Media Press Inc.



Conference abstracts

2021

Hörster, M., Fink, L., Wald-Fuhrmann, M., Poeppel, D. & Larrouy-Maestri, P. (2021, Nov.). Speech, music, or “raindrops on drums”: Labels influence the categorization of sounds. International conference of students of systematic musicology (SysMus21), Aarhus, Denmark.

Lange, E. & Fink, L. (2021, Aug.). What is the relation between musical features and spontaneous or restricted blink activity? Blick und Bewegung Symposium, organized by Jörg Mühlhans. Talk (virtual) presented at the DAGA 47. Deutsche Jahrestagung für Akustik, Vienna, Austria.

Fink, L., Janata, P., Ganapathy, S., Furukawa, S., Lange, L. (July, 2021). Spectral signatures of the pupillary response as an implicit measure of musical absorption. Talk (virtual) presented at the International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition. Watch here

Warrenburg, *Fink, L., L. A., Howlin, C., Randall, W. M., +Hansen, N. C., & +Wald-Fuhrmann, M. (2021, in press). Viral Tunes: Changes in musical behaviours and interest in coronamusic predict socio-emotional coping during COVID-19 lockdown. *Talk (virtual) presented at the International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition. Watch here

Larrouy-Maestri, P., Fink, L., Durojaye, C., Hörster, M., Poeppel, D. & Wald-Fuhrmann, M. (2021, July). Music or language or both: Effect of the task on the classification of dùndún talking drum stimuli. Talk (virtual) presented at the International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition. Watch here

Lange, E. & Fink, L. (2021, July). Eyeblink activity during music listening. Talk (virtual) presented at the International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition. Watch here

Czepiel, A., Fink, L., Seibert, C., Scharinger, M. (2021, July). Multimodality of music listening: how live versus recorded versions of piano music influence aesthetic, physiological, and neural responses in a concert setting. Poster (virtual) presented at the International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition.

Fink, L., Alexander, P., Janata, P. (2021, June). The influence of metronome adaptivity and auditory feedback on group tapping. Talk presented at the Rhythm Perception & Production Workshop, Oslo, Norway (virtual). Watch here

Czepiel, A., Fink, L.K., Fink, L.T., Wald-Fuhrmann, M., Tröndle, M., & Merrill, J. (2021, June). Inter-subject correlation of physiological responses during live musical performances. Poster presented at the Neuromusic VII conference, Aarhus, Denmark (virtual).

2020

Fink, L., Howlin, C., Randall, W., Warrenburg, L., Hansen, N.C., Wald-Fuhrmann, M. (2020, Sept.) Music as a tool for socio-emotional coping during Covid-19 pandemic lockdown. Talk (virtual) presented at the Society for Education, Music, and Psychology Research.

Czepiel, A., Merrill, J., Fink, L., Egermann, H., Wald-Fuhrmann, M. (2020, Sept.) Tempo and key clarity synchronise physiology in classical concert audiences. Poster (virtual) presented at the Deutschen Gesellschaft für Musikpsychologie Virtuelle Postertagung.

Lange, E., Zweck, F., Sinn, P., Thiel, D., Fink, L., & Kujipers, M. (2020, Sept.) Eye-tracking as method to investigate experiences of aesthetic absorption. Poster (virtual) presented at the Deutschen Gesellschaft für Musikpsychologie Virtuelle Postertagung.

2019

Fink, L., Hurley, B., Geng, J., Lange, E., & Janata, P. (2019, Aug.). A computational model of rhythmic auditory attention predicts the pupillary response to music. Talk presented at the European Conference on Eye Movements, Alicante, Spain.

Lange, E., Thiele, D., Fink, L., & Kuijpers, M. (2019, Aug.). Narrative aesthetic absorption into audiobooks: Acoustics, cross-modal coupling and subjective states are related. Poster presented at the European Conference on Eye Movements, Alicante, Spain.

Fink, L., Alexander, P. & Janata, J. (2019, March). Bringing groups of people into greater temporal and psychological synchrony using a multi-person adaptive metronome. Poster presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Mikovits, M., Sperber, L., Fink, L. & Prebel, J. (2019, March). Writing Fellows as Agents of Transfer: Training in Threshold Concepts to Support Campus-Wide Sites of Writing. Symposium presented at the College Composition and Communication Convention, Pittsburgh, PA.

2018

Fink, L., Lange, E. & Janata, P. (2018, July). The pupil entrains to prominent periodicities in music. Talk presented at the International Conference on Music Perception & Cognition, Graz, Austria.

Fink, L., Hurley, B., Geng, J., & Janata, P. (2018, May). Predicting attention and motor responses to musical patterns. Poster presented at the Stanford Music & Brain Symposium, Palo Alto, CA.

Fink, L., Ribeiro, J., & White, V. (2018, March). Transforming graduate writing experiences: A new Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) certificate program. Symposium presented at the College Composition and Communication Convention, Kansas City, MO.

2017

Lange, E. & Fink, L. (2017, August). Symposium: Using eye-tracking and pupillometry to study rhythmic processing in music and dance. Proceedings of the European Conference on Eye Movements, Wüppertal, Germany, pgs. 73-75.

Fink, L., Geng, J., Hurley, B. & Janata, P. (2017, August). Predicting attention to auditory rhythms using a linear oscillator model and pupillometry. Conference on Music & Eye-Tracking, Frankfurt, Germany.

Hurley, B., Fink, L., & Janata, P. (2017, March). A resonator model predicts temporal orienting in rhythmic music. Proceedings of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting.

Bright, A., Singleton, J., Fink, L., & Rodger, K. (2017, March). Cultivating a Rhetorical Consciousness: Supporting Graduate Student Writers Across the Curriculum. Symposium presented at the College Composition and Communication Convention, Portland, OR.

2016

Fink, L., Hurley, B., Geng, J. & Janata, P. (2016, July). Pupillary and eyeblink responses to auditory stimuli index attention and sensorimotor coupling. Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition, pg. 788.

Hurley, B., Fink, L., & Janata, P. (2016, July). Predicting temporal attention in music with a damped oscillator model. Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Music Perception & Cognition, pg. 782

Fink, L. & Rodger, K. (2016, June). Mapping Neuroscience through Professional Writing. Talk presented at the International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Ann Arbor, MI.

2015

Fink, L. (2015, July). Eyeblinks as biomarkers of temporal coordination during music cognition. Poster presented at the Rhythm Perception & Production Workshop, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2014

Fink, L., Niemeyer, T., Jones, S., Larabee, Z., & Schuette, P. (2014, November). Oscillator Etudes. Performance premiere at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, Indianapolis, IN.

2013

Fink, L. & Mazman, A. (2013, July). False belief attribution: An investigation of the neural pattern account. Poster presented at the Society for Philosophy and Psychology Conference, Providence, RI.



Doctoral dissertation

Predicting sensorimotor synchronization and attention to music using a linear oscillator model, eye-tracking, and electroencephalography

Supervised by Petr Janata

ABSTRACT

Rhythm is a ubiquitous feature of music that induces specific neural modes of processing. In the following studies, we employ a computational model to predict fluctuations in attention as a function of temporal structure. We test our predictions against behavioral indices of attention, namely perceptual thresholds (Chs. 2 & 3) and subjective reports (Ch 4), as well as neural markers of attention – changes in pupil size (Chs. 2-4) and cortical activity recorded via electroencephalography (EEG; Ch 3). Chapter 1 highlights key theories regarding the cognitive and neurophysiological underpinnings of changes in pupil size to situate a discussion of the pupillary response to sound in future chapters. Chapters 2 and 3 detail the results of variations on an adaptive thresholding experiment in which participants detect deviants embedded into rhythmic patterns at multiple temporal locations. In both intensity increment (Ch 2) and decrement (Ch 3) versions of the experiment, we observed 1) perceptual thresholds vary as a function of output from the computational model, 2) a pupil dilation response to detected and missed (below perceptual threshold) deviants, with evoked pupil amplitude predicting participants’ responses. Chapter 3 discusses preliminary EEG results and the relationship between pupillary and cortical indices of auditory attention. In chapters 2 and 3 we also analyze the continuous pupillary response to the various rhythmic patterns and show entrainment to predicted prominent periodicities, as well as coherence between the pupil signal and the modelled temporal salience predictions. We extend these findings in Chapter 4, showing pupillary entrainment to complex, ‘real-world’ music that is predicted by participants’ absorption and familiarity ratings. We conclude that the model is relevant in predicting the temporal salience of complex stimuli and that the continuous pupillary signal can reveal psychologically relevant, fine-grained information about an attended auditory stimulus.

Full text available for download on ProQuest



Masters thesis

Supervised by Ian Cross

Abstract:

Eyeblinks have yet to attract significant attention in music cognition research, though they have been studied extensively in other domains. Rather than an artifact to be removed in eye tracking or EEG data, eyeblinks, and their connection with musical behaviors, warrant proper exploration.

Background: Eyeblinks tend to occur at structurally salient breaks during both reading and speech; they are likely to occur at the ends of sentences and paragraphs in a text, or at pauses and turns in speech (Orchard & Stern, 1991; Cummins, 2012). Interestingly, blinks are often synchronized, or temporally coordinated, between speakers (Nakano & Kitazawa, 2010); however, individuals with autism spectrum disorders fail to show such synchrony, perhaps indicating that temporal coordination is at the root of social communication impairments (Nakano et al., 2011).

Further, eyeblinks can be read as indicators of a variety of psychological and clinical states (Oh et al., 2012). Mirroring attention/arousal and modulated by dopamine (DA), eyeblinks reveal information about sleepiness, attentiveness, and the difficulty of a task (Ponder & Kennedy, 1927; Schleicher et al., 2008). Blink rate (BR) is directly proportional to DA levels, with Parkinson’s patients (low DA/low BR) and schizophrenics (high DA/high BR) at opposite ends of the dopamine/blinking spectrum (Barbato et al., 2012; Colzato et al., 2009; Esteban et al., 2004). Such dopamine-linked disorders typically involve disruptions in timing and/or motor processes, mediated by brainstem structures like the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Eyeblink analysis is an established neuropsychological tool – used to evaluate dopamine function, cognitive load, and both temporal and social coordination. Such analysis can reasonably be expected to be relevant in the scientific study of music.

Present Aims: Because eyeblinks have clear social and clinical implications, the goal of this thesis is to examine the role eyeblinks might play in music cognition and to discuss the results of a sight- reading experiment conducted at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Results of the experiment suggest that, in general, eyeblinks are suppressed while sight-reading; however, blinks that do occur tend to be at musical phrase transitions or at other structurally relevant musical instances. While there is variability across participants in average number of blinks per reading, there is an incredible amount of consistency on an individual basis in average number of blinks, as well as musical/temporal location of blinks across readings. Overall, it seems that eyeblinks provide insights into an individual’s chunking of musical information and are likely to be a particularly useful evaluative tool in pedagogical and/or therapeutic settings, in addition to experimental ones.

Full Text Available for download on ResearchGate